Hollandse Herdershonden Herplaatsing

The English page


Adopt a Dutch shepherd......


"Mika" was advertised on this site and went to a new home. Perhaps you might find a four-legged friend here too. (photo: N. van der Sterren)

The original aim of this web site is to be helpful in finding good new homes for Dutch shepherd dogs and Dutch shepherd mixes.
The inspiration came from seeing various breed rescue sites on the Net, combined with the fact that I at that time owned my first rescue Dutchie, a wonderful roughhaired male named Ercoles. You can see his picture on the main page of this site, he's on the left in the group picture.
I do not actively do rescue work such as getting dogs out of shelters or taking dogs in my house as temporary guests. Instead, I've started this website, on which people can advertise their dogs.
 

Whenever I'm in the right mood, I add pages with information about the breed to the site. More about that later; let's now first assume you came in here to buy a Dutch shepherd dog. Where, then, do you go from here?   

To view the available dogs, you must go to the main page of the site (click here). Then go to the heading "Op zoek naar een nieuwe baas" (= "In search of a new owner"). There are listed four categories: 'Korthaar' (short haired), 'Langhaar' (long haired), 'Ruwhaar' (rough haired) and 'Stamboomloos en kruisingen' (Non-registered & Mixes).
Below each description in Dutch, you'll find a short description in English (blue text). If you are interested in a certain dog, you can contact the person mentioned at the end of the Dutch advertisement. To make a phone call from outside Holland, dial 0031 and then the advertiser's number without the initial 0.

As this is a Holland-based web site, almost all the dogs on offer are living in The Netherlands. I am aware that there is little chance of them being adopted by someone living abroad, but... one never knows, does one?  And anyway, I like the idea of foreign visitors being able to understand what this site is about.

If you're looking for an (adult) Dutchie and you do not find what you're looking for, come back later. You may also contact the Dutch breed club's puppy info , phone 043-6040504  (keeps also a list of available adult dogs).

If you're living in the USA, don't forget to check out the American Dutch shepherd rescue website.


Buying a puppy

If you'd rather buy a Dutch shepherd pup instead of an adult dog, you can contact the NHC's puppy info mentioned above. The club's puppy list is also published on the website www.hollandseherder.nl .

On this site http://home.wanadoo.nl/hollandseherderinfo/   you can find a list of matings and litters born all over Europe. These litters are on the puppy lists of the various European breed clubs.


... but what is a Dutch shepherd?

It is one of Holland's national breeds, created by farmers and shepherds to tend the sheep and do all kinds of odd jobs. The breed's name in its own country is "Hollandse herdershond" or "Hollandse herder". (When searching the Internet for information about the breed, you might want to use its proper name, too; thus, you can find a larger number of informative sites than if you'd only look for "dutch shepherd".) There are three coat types: short hair, long hair and rough (wire) hair. The breed club is one of the oldest in The Netherlands, being founded in 1898.

The right dog for me?   here you can read something about the breed's temperament

The breed's original job , sheep-herding 

Photo page  updated with new pictures 4-6-2013


Is the Dutch shepherd a recognized breed?
A note especially for American visitors of this web site.
The Dutch shepherd is (in Europe, at least) a recognized pure breed just the same as the German shepherd, the Whippet, the Golden Retriever etc. etc.
As with any breed, there are also dogs not registered in the Kennel Club's Stud Book, as well as mixes of Dutch shepherds with other dogs.
A lot of the (shepherd) dogs bred by Police Dog enthusiasts are of such unregistered stock, or let us say "unofficially registered", because there is usually some record of their parentage kept by the breeder. It is mostly dogs of those lines that are imported into America.
A dog coming from Holland with a paper with ancestors' names on it, may therefore not necessarily be what one would call a "purebred". The list of names might as well come from the breeder's private archives.
If the dog, or some of its ancestors, are listed as "xHH" on its papers, it is a "crossbred Hollandse herder".  "MH" or "xMH" stands for (crossbred) Mechelse herder = Malinois.

This is what a pedigree issued by the Dutch Kennel Club looks like:

So, if your import from Holland comes with a document like this, it is what we consider here a "registered purebred".

Of course I am not suggesting that everybody 'should' buy a Kennel Club registered dog. If you are looking for a dog especially for protection / police work, one from the mixed 'police dog' lines might be a good choice.
It is just that the variety of papers and pedigrees coming with the imported dogs might cause some confusion, and my only aim here is to clear things up a bit.


Other pages in English on this website:

Booklet: There is no all-comprising book in English about the breed. There is, however, a booklet with many photographs and English text, but only about the breed's exterior. To read more about this booklet and how to order a copy, click here .

Agenda if you're spending your holiday in The Netherlands, you might as well combine it with "something doggy".  Not all on this page is translated; the word "hondententoonstelling" means "dog show" and "wandeling" means "walk". 
 

Register of purebred Dutch shepherds in The Netherlands


Links to other Dutch shepherd websites:

A big collection of links can be found here:  Hollandse herder-startpagina


Any questions or suggestions, or just say hello? You can use the guestbook 
 

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or mail me (Pauline van Vliet) privately at pq@lombok.nl.


 

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